Manda Rae

adventures in art, fashion, food, etc.

chirart:

crescend:

humourandgaming:

No one complains when Shakespeare makes an all male cast to tell a story about brotherhood amongst men but Square Enix does the same thing and they’re sexist? Go play Final Fantasy XIII, XIII-2 and Lightning Returns if you need a game about an empowering woman.

Y’all are dumb and need to read some Shakespeare.

This, thank you.

1) Shakespeare penned his plays late 16th-early 17th century, Square Enix produces their games in the late 20th-early 21st centuries. Generally it’s common sense to not go “someone in a less socially evolved era did this, why can’t our videogames/movies/books today!?” Like. Pretty sure all of tumblr exists to explain to all of us why that is not the smartest of thinking.

2) Every preceding FF game has always been (relatively) good about cast diversity, it’s not unreasonable nor is it unprecedented to expect it out of FF15. Call me crazy but suddenly creating an all-dude cast after years and history of not having all-dude games kind of is a step backward.

3) FF13 is the first game after six FF games to feature a female protagonist. “This game has your female hero character, go play THAT” kind of treats that game trilogy as a consolation prize. And this is without delving into how the sequel games were progressively made with male-gaze fanservice in mind.

4) I mean yeah, go read Shakespeare, that’s always good way to spend one’s time. Not going to argue that one.

Also see hundreds of examples of criticism where people describe in great detail how Shakespeare was sexist. And antisemitic. And transphobic. And racist. 

It’s not like people are blaming Shakespeare for living in a time of less social and psychological awareness than we have now, but just because something has historical basis for sexism, or antisemitism or what have you, doesn’t mean it is completely impervious to any criticism whatsoever. And, y’know, it really does make the need for such criticism all the more necessary when in the 21st century we are still acting like sexism is something to be expected from creators. By saying that Shakespeare is the great standard to which you hold all media, and using that as a prime example of why…..sexism doesn’t exist?….you are basically saying that as a society we cannot progress any further towards equality, that we can’t even put ONE female character in a video game because we don’t see it as important or interesting enough…and that is just a little fucked up. 

wiseyoungravenclaw:

Remus Arthur Potter, you were named after two men who looked out for my safety and cared about my well-being out of altruism and decency rather than because I was a tool for them to use or because I was someone’s son.

(via burdge)

amandaonwriting:

Happy Birthday, Flannery O’Connor, born 25 March 1925, died 3 August 1964
12 Writing Tips From Flannery O’Connor
I’m a full-time believer in writing habits…You may be able to do without them if you have genius but most of us only have talent and this is simply something that has to be assisted all the time by physical and mental habits or it dries up and blows away…Of course you have to make your habits in this conform to what you can do. I write only about two hours every day because that’s all the energy I have, but I don’t let anything interfere with those two hours, at the same time and the same place.
The writer operates at a peculiar crossroads where time and place and eternity somehow meet. His problem is to find that location. 
Try arranging [your novel] backwards and see what you see. I thought this stunt up from my art classes, where we always turn the picture upside down, on its two sides, to see what lines need to be added. A lot of excess stuff will drop off this way.
I certainly believe a story has to have meaning, but the meaning in a story can’t be paraphrased and if it’s there it’s there, almost more as a physical than an intellectual fact. 
I think that anything that makes you overly conscious of the language is bad for the story usually.
It might be dangerous for you to have too much time to write. I mean if you took off a year and had nothing else to do but write and weren’t used to doing it all the time then you might get discouraged.
People without hope not only don’t write novels, but what is more to the point, they don’t read them.
Writing a novel is a terrible experience, during which the hair often falls out and the teeth decay. I’m always irritated by people who imply that writing fiction is an escape from reality. It is a plunge into reality and it’s very shocking to the system.
This may seem a small matter but the omniscient narrator never speaks colloquially. This is something it has taken me a long time to learn myself. Every time you do it you lower the tone.
The writer can choose what he writes about but he cannot choose what he is able to make live. 
Manners are of such great consequence to the novelist that any kind will do. Bad manners are better than no manners at all, and because we are losing our customary manners, we are probably overly conscious of them; this seems to be a condition that produces writers. 
Fiction is about everything human and we are made out of dust, and if you scorn getting yourself dusty, then you shouldn’t try to write fiction. It’s not a grand enough job for you.
Flannery O’Connor was an important voice in American literature. She wrote two novels and 32 short stories, as well as reviews and commentaries. She wrote in a Southern Gothic style. Her writing reflected her Roman Catholic faith and explored morality and ethics.
by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

amandaonwriting:

Happy Birthday, Flannery O’Connor, born 25 March 1925, died 3 August 1964

12 Writing Tips From Flannery O’Connor

  1. I’m a full-time believer in writing habits…You may be able to do without them if you have genius but most of us only have talent and this is simply something that has to be assisted all the time by physical and mental habits or it dries up and blows away…Of course you have to make your habits in this conform to what you can do. I write only about two hours every day because that’s all the energy I have, but I don’t let anything interfere with those two hours, at the same time and the same place.
  2. The writer operates at a peculiar crossroads where time and place and eternity somehow meet. His problem is to find that location. 
  3. Try arranging [your novel] backwards and see what you see. I thought this stunt up from my art classes, where we always turn the picture upside down, on its two sides, to see what lines need to be added. A lot of excess stuff will drop off this way.
  4. I certainly believe a story has to have meaning, but the meaning in a story can’t be paraphrased and if it’s there it’s there, almost more as a physical than an intellectual fact. 
  5. I think that anything that makes you overly conscious of the language is bad for the story usually.
  6. It might be dangerous for you to have too much time to write. I mean if you took off a year and had nothing else to do but write and weren’t used to doing it all the time then you might get discouraged.
  7. People without hope not only don’t write novels, but what is more to the point, they don’t read them.
  8. Writing a novel is a terrible experience, during which the hair often falls out and the teeth decay. I’m always irritated by people who imply that writing fiction is an escape from reality. It is a plunge into reality and it’s very shocking to the system.
  9. This may seem a small matter but the omniscient narrator never speaks colloquially. This is something it has taken me a long time to learn myself. Every time you do it you lower the tone.
  10. The writer can choose what he writes about but he cannot choose what he is able to make live. 
  11. Manners are of such great consequence to the novelist that any kind will do. Bad manners are better than no manners at all, and because we are losing our customary manners, we are probably overly conscious of them; this seems to be a condition that produces writers. 
  12. Fiction is about everything human and we are made out of dust, and if you scorn getting yourself dusty, then you shouldn’t try to write fiction. It’s not a grand enough job for you.

Flannery O’Connor was an important voice in American literature. She wrote two novels and 32 short stories, as well as reviews and commentaries. She wrote in a Southern Gothic style. Her writing reflected her Roman Catholic faith and explored morality and ethics.

by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

(via eitlim)

breebird33:

angryseawitch:

screamingcrawfish:

a paranormal mockumentary show in the style of the office/parks and rec

revolving around the lives of employees at a hokey haunted mansion tourist trap that turn out to be actually hella haunted but most of its spirits are either benevolent or ineffectively malevolent

10/10 WOULD WATCH

image

(via sairobee)

sapphberry:

oak23:

If you don’t think the American dub of Sailor moon is a masterpiece then you aren’t no friend of mine

gets me every time

(via themarysue)